Monday, February 04, 2019

Greg Paquette "Absolute Crime" from the disc SINGLE STONE


_________________________

Greg Paquette
ALBUM:  Single Stone
10 tracks


   The Track "Absolute Crime" from the Single Stone CD recorded by Greg Paquette is a folksy, dreamy, lilting number and at 4:24 is the third shortest track on this 10 song album. The band features Joey Hovey on drums and percussion, Greg Paquette on guitars, Jake Miracle vocalist and Kevin Megaldino on bass.  It's a sterling production with a strong choir behind the chorus, it's catchy and very radio friendly.   


"Your Working Boy" (remake) Mobile Steam Unit

Mobile Steam Unit


Time: 2:29


        With undeniable Beatles' keyboards Mobile Steam Unit re-craft the song that was often played on Pop Explosion, this writer's radio program, is re-issued on Spotify with a thicker, more polished emphasis on its original theme.  The original from 2013 also clocks in at 2:29, and is condensed, the clever interplay between the instruments tucked deeper into the grooves.  That rendition is found on their disc Not In Service available on Bandcamp https://mobilesteamunit.bandcamp.com/album/not-in-service

       This version sparkles with production elements hitting you in the face, and the sometimes smooth and sometimes chaotic instrumentation works on every level.       

        Pop, funk, groove and some jazzy fragments from The Beatles "You Know My Name (Look Up The Number,) seeping into the last ten seconds of this recording, really tremendous.

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/3xVedvLKolMTZUR3iVZThb

       On Spotify it segues quickly into "Less Texting," which I can relate to given my alleged significant other's activities, and not only that, a former girlfriend of another friend of mine.  It's a no brainer that "Less Texting" is something needed in our current society, on a world-wide level.

       The Mobile Steam Unit 2019 e.p. on Spotify - including Less Texting, Sex With O.S., Are You Ever and this new "Your Working Boy" is a terrific four slices of MSU at their best.



See video of Your Working Boy
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PqPFVTu1PPU



Listen to songs Live at WFMU for Techtonic with Mark Hurst, 7/9/2018
http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Mobile_Steam_Unit/


Not in Service disc with original "Your Working Boy"
https://mobilesteamunit.bandcamp.com/album/not-in-service




Judy Dessanti on Mobile Steam Unit
https://patch.com/massachusetts/boston/nys-mobile-steam-unit-return-nov-2-2018-lizard-lounge-cambridge

Saturday, February 02, 2019

The Man Trap - Star Trek #1 9-8-66 Star Date 1513.4 Planet M-113

     On September  8, 1966 this writer was 12 years old and became an instant Star Trek fan when The Man Trap aired.  Star Trek quickly became my favorite TV show and there's no doubt that it is still my #1 show 53 years later, most of my life.

      Leonard McCoy believes Nancy is still 25 years old, "She hasn't aged a day, hasn't got a gray hair in her head" Dr. McCoy states, Captain Kirk says "She's a handsome woman" but that she has some gray.    A few minutes into the show "He's dead, Jim" - a classic quote from McCoy starts off the Star Trek legacy. 

    A look at IMDB for the late actor Michael Laslow  (Godfather of actor Christian Slater and, also according to IMDB won " a Daytime Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series in 1994 for the role") makes you wonder if he appeared at any Star Trek conventions setting the stage after two pilots for the series were created, his "The Man Trap" being the first show to air.

IMDB notes "The first victim for whom Dr. McCoy uttered the famous words, "He's dead, Jim".

Didn't I say that already?
__________________________________________________________

The very first Star Trek casualty (made fun of in Galaxy Quest, the spoof of Star Trek made for the big screen,)  Zaslow had a relatively short life - only 56 years cut short by Lou Gherig's disease.


Bornin Inglewood, California, USA
Diedin New York City, New York, USA
______________________________________________________

      Sodium Chloride, no salt in his body.

      Five years Professor Robert Crater (Crater?  On a planet?) played by Alfred Ryder (also appeared on 1979's Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, Six Million Dollar Man, Charlie's Angels) is married to a homicidal maniac who disguises itself as her wife, Nancy Crater (who leaves craters on men's faces as it sucks the salt out of them) played by Jeanne Bal (who had the distinction of being on 4 Perry Mason episodes, 1961, 1962 and 1965 playing the parts of .. Rosemary Welch, Vera Wynne, Dr. Linda Carey and Helen Rand!)
The Case of the Telltale Tap (1965) ... Vera Wynne
The Case of the Angry Astronaut (1962) ... Dr. Linda Carey
The Case of the Misguided Missile (1961) ... Helen Rand

Gene Rodenberry had worked on Have Gun - Will Travel and The Virginian and other TV shows prior to Star Trek
_______________________________________________________________________

For the past 45 minutes I've been reminiscing while The Man Trap plays, MeTV airing the Star Trek series again on Ground Hog day, 2019.


Friday, February 01, 2019

Eric-Lee-Music Two CDs reviewed by JV

Reviews by Joe Viglione



http://www.tmrzoo.com/2017/71922/review-eric-lee-eric-lee-self-titled-cd

“Miles above the Ground” opens this six song set of originals from Western Massachusetts phenom Eric Lee who brings his smooth, compelling voice and introspection to this strong four and a half minute composition. Lee has more than a grasp of the vibrations he sends forth, playing violins, mandolin, electric violin and guitar with the music here focused, entertaining and highly commercial. “The Raven” shuffles along under J.J. O’Connell’s drums and the bass of Rhees Williams while “Rose and Storm” adds a balance.
Critics can compare the storytelling of a Gordon Lightfoot to the dramas offered by Jim Croce, but to say that Eric Lee paints with his own style and magic is to understate what this artist has crafted. And take caution – there are many, many singer/songwriters out there named Eric Lee, so one has to seek out the music that I’m writing about here. Lee has performed on the road with the great Eric Andersen, Peter Rowan of The Rowan Brothers and Seatrain, John Gorka, Vance Gilbert, the Grand Slambovians and so many others. It’s easy to get mistaken for a backing musician, as Carole King and Neil Diamond at first were thought by the public to be songwriters dabbling with hit records.
Time proved both King and Diamond to be major forces beyond their work for other artists and this Lee is himself making waves regionally outside of the background circuit he participated in for the last decade and more. With Jim Henry’s electric guitar and dobro fitting in perfectly with this quartet and some backing vocals from Brie Sullivan and Max Wareham, these half a dozen songs stand up to repeated spins with “Hands of Fortune” and “To Write You a Song” truly remarkable. At the risk of sounding overly complimentary, those who have followed this writer’s thousands of reviews over the past almost five decades know that I can be as rough on poorly made recordings as I can hand out the accolades on the ones with merit. There’s something very special here. You’ll know you’ve reached the right Eric Lee as this music stands in a class by itself.
Joe Viglione is the Chief Film Critic at TMRZoo.com. 
And the 2nd CD, Heartache Town
In the 3 years since the eponymous Eric Lee extended-play mini album comes this perfectly produced collection of twelve compositions with huge crossover potential. Heartache Town, the title track, is pure pop Americana succinctly wrapped up in two minutes and forty-five seconds. It drives, captivates, and brings the listener in with the elegance of James Taylor and an integrity so essential to believability.
The singer’s voice is the intro flowing into an immediate groove that gives a solid foundation for the storyline – for Lee’s prime instrument is (actually are) those vocal chords, above his ability to play, pluck and strum a variety of different vibrating strings attached to a multitude of different wooden platforms.
“Another Bloody Mary Morning” is a rock hootenanny with bluegrass overtones and a showcase for the singer’s ability to discretely traverse different styles. Those styles change quickly from song to song, quickly yet ever so slightly, with the tunes placed in an inviting way begging for repeated spins.
“Silver Headstone” goes pure traditional country – almost three minutes before the five minute “Prince of Dreamers.” And despite the reference to James Taylor above, Lee’s influences aren’t that glaring, he tucks the many sources he draws from onto an original canvas that makes it all very appealing.
Two epics are “Fall of Man,” and “To Write You A Song,” the latter appearing on the previous collection as well. “Fall of Man” features Eric Lee – lead vocal, acoustic guitar, mandolin, baritone violin, electric fiddle, violins, electric guitar, Tracy Grammer – harmony vocal, Greg Greenway – harmony vocal, Matthew Thornton – cello, Jim Henry – electric lead guitar, Paul Kochanski – bass, J.J. O’Connell – drums, Brian Johnson – sitar – and the accompanists are listed straight from the press information to give a scope on how many different ideas and vibrations combine to give these story songs such lively brio and heart.
The semi-duet on “Lucky Penny,” a song co-written with Neale Eckstein, brings a nice change of pace, though it’s still Eric Lee’s vocal chords that pave the way. A deep, intentionally underplayed acoustic guitar as lead instrument, “I Wish I Was a Plumber” is a musician’s lament, reminiscent of Tony Hendra (Spinal Tap) and his amazing, insightful John Lennon parody “If I could be a fisherman I would be a fisherman but I can’t because I’m a (expletive) Genius.” Co-written with Pete Nelson the rhythm section of Kochanski and O’Connell are a delight while Ryan Hommel’s pedal steel also demanding mention.
Again it is Lee’s heartfelt voice and observations which catch your attention while sterling accompaniment embraces the themes of the dozen written essays, smoothly enveloped by these vibrant musical textures
http://eric-lee-music.com
1. The Garden (Where No Burdens Will Pass Through) 03:09
2. Heartache Town 02:45
3. Another Bloody Mary Morning 03:49
4. Silver Headstone 02:58
5. Prince of Dreamers 05:08 buy track
6. Fall of Man 06:29
7. I Wish I Was a Plumber 05:51
8. Lucky Penny 03:50
9. Life Without You 03:10
10. To Write You a Song 06:35
11. Giving Up On You 05:18
12. Help My Neighbor On 04:31
CD Baby
https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/ericlee4
Bandcamp:
https://ericleesongs.bandcamp.com/releases

From Eric's webpage

REVIEWS

In the 3 years since the eponymous Eric Lee extended-play mini album comes this perfectly produced collection of twelve compositions with huge crossover potential.  “Heartache Town”, the title track, is pure pop Americana succinctly wrapped up in two minutes and forty-five seconds.  It drives, captivates, and brings the listener in with the elegance of James Taylor and an integrity so essential to believability. The singer's voice is the intro flowing into an immediate groove that gives a solid foundation for the storyline for Lee's prime instrument are those vocal chords, above his ability to play, pluck and strum a variety of different vibrating strings attached to a multitude of different wooden platforms. "Another Bloody Mary Morning" is a rock hootenanny with bluegrass overtones and a showcase for the singer's ability to discretely traverse different styles.  Those styles change quickly from song to song, quickly yet ever so slightly, with the tunes placed in an inviting way begging for repeated spins.  "Silver Headstone" goes pure traditional country - almost three minutes before the five minute "Prince of Dreamers."  And despite the reference to James Taylor above, Lee's influences aren't that glaring, he tucks the many sources he draws from onto an original canvas that makes it all very appealing.   Two epics are "Fall of Man," and "To Write You A Song," the latter appearing on the previous collection as well.  "Fall of Man" features Eric Lee - lead vocal, acoustic guitar, mandolin, baritone violin, electric fiddle, violins, electric guitar, Tracy Grammer - harmony vocal, Greg Greenway - harmony vocal, Matthew Thornton - cello, Jim Henry - electric lead guitar, Paul Kochanski - bass, J.J. O’Connell - drums, Brian Johnson - sitar - and the accompanists are listed straight from the press information to give a scope on how many different ideas and vibrations combine to give these story songs such lively brio and heart. The semi-duet on "Lucky Penny," a song co-written with Neale Eckstein, brings a nice change of pace, though it's still Eric Lee's vocal chords that pave the way. A deep, intentionally underplayed acoustic guitar as lead instrument,  "I Wish I Was a Plumber" is a musician's lament, reminiscent of Tony Hendra (Spinal Tap) and his amazing, insightful John Lennon parody "If I could be a fisherman I would be a fisherman but I can't because I'm a (expletive) Genius."   Co-written with Pete Nelson, the rhythm section of Kochanski and O'Connell are a delight while Ryan Homer’s pedal steel also demand mention.
    Again it is Lee's heartfelt voice and observations catch your attention while the sterling accompaniment embraces the themes of these dozen essays, smoothly enveloped by these vibrant musical textures
- Joe Viglione

Cindy Latin New song! and Video Flyin' Home


Cindy Latin - Flyin' Home
Review By JV

This is such an uplifting song, it grabbed me immediately and had to play it again and again.  Cindy has knocked it out of the park with the exciting opening, superb keyboards and musical sounds that swirl around the background of this excellent production, with Latin's voice hitting notes all over the scale.  A song to put you in a good mood.  The Youtube https://youtu.be/-il_z0AYx3o 
Steve Bennett says "Love this song," while  Dee Baby notes "You killed it."
As Cindy sings the keyboard gives a splashy underscore - and the sounds coming out of her soul, just happy go lucky like you've just fallen' in love. Nice stuff.   Marissa Salazar writes "This is a beautiful music video. You look stunning."  See for yourself with the link above.

Greg Parquette New CD


Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Hat Tricks From Heaven: The Story of an Athlete in His Own Prison of Addiction



 _____________________________





 Kate Genove's fourth published book, Hat Tricks From Heaven:  The Story of An Athlete Trapped in His Own Prison of Addiction" is a precise - and supportive - story, an important story, which lays bare the quote, The death of one man is a tragedy, the death of millions is a statistic."  

    Christopher John "Geno" Genovese is a tragic story which is told by a registered nurse who knows "Geno" better than most, his own mom.  
    Though Kate's previous books touched upon family issues, Hat Tricks from Heaven, goes the deepest, and it has to.  As a message and a memoir.

     The placement of Geno's birth chapter next to the chapter on his passing was a jolt for this reader. To me it made clear how precious, and short, life is. It's a wonder how an author is able to come up with such a distinctly different approach under such stress? 

     Let's look back at Kate's published work to get an understanding of where this new work fits in the chronology:


1)Thirty Years in September

Kate Genovese’s first published book, Thirty Years in September: A Nurse’s Memoir –  a chronicle of thirty years of Kate’s nursing career, is a sad, funny and political romp that focuses on her patients, personal stories, anecdotes and demise of our health care system. Drawing from her vast life experience, Genovese talks frankly about her own past drug addiction, loss of nurse’s license and recovery.  Keep in mind this was published in 2000, nine years before actress Edie Falco’s celebrated Showtime TV series, Nurse Jackie.

2)Loving Joe Gallucci

Loving Joe Gallucci is the second book from Kate Genovese, released in 2003 and now the basis for a film script.

3)Two Weeks Since My Last Confession

The third book from Kate Genovese, a fictional story about the O’Brien family focusing on Molly O’Brien and her brother Sean, covering thirty years of Molly’s tumultuous life; the damage of her Catholic upbringing, teenage pregnancy, sexual abuse and eventual drug addiction portraying a strong woman who overcomes the obstacles and returns back to the roots of her family’s religion.

http://kategenovesebooks.com/books-by-kate-genovese/


If someone passes at 30, or someone passes at 100, there just doesn't seem to be enough of life.  Death from old age is a tragedy too that we are forced to accept, but this Opioid crisis 
is having a devastating impact on society.  Kate's journey with the book has introduced her to people who have also lost loved ones, and others trying desperately to help those they care about from this epidemic.  She touches upon very private details of her own life, marriage, travels, and  makes the reader more comfortable with a story that is very uncomfortable.  And that's part of Kate's gift for speaking plainly and resolutely about life situations.







































Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Steve Dennis 5 Song E.P.

Steve Dennis E.P. 
Review by Joe Viglione 

Spotify 
______________
The Swell 
Real Love 
Quick Sand 
As Much As I’ve Loved You 
Try Me On 

May 30 2017 TMRZoo published our first review of the fine music from Steve Dennis including the titles “Reboot,” “Dubhe,” “Your Garden,” “The King,” and “Any Time Now” …while noting that “the tunes innocently show themselves to be complete in this simple setting.” 

Fast forward to this December 2018 release, the self-titled Steve Dennis 5 song extended play offering more production polish on the exquisite “Quicksand,” light, simple and very radio friendly. It will catch your attention immediately - “Baby, I don’t know, where it went wrong…your emotions never show, maybe it’s been too long” almost a psychological self-study.  Doesn’t matter that at 4:45 it pushes the airplay envelope, it is an attractive melody with grooving instrumentation that calls for repeated spins. 

“Real Love” has the same folksy charm that made the 2017 songs so moving and heartfelt.  Guitar and harmonica blend to give an overall feeling of hope tucked inside this blues/pop ballad that floats down a river as introspection falls into place. 

“As Much as I Loved You” will tug at your heart – it did to this writer – especially if the love affair you have is in some sort of conflict, short and sweet and effective, a powerful quick statement on the state of emotion. 

“Try Me On” has a dance beat and dominant guitar work and is a stark change of pace from what we’ve heard from Steve before.  The artist knows how to pitch a catchy chorus with dangling musical sounds embellishing the story. 

“The Swell” seems drawn from the musician’s time in Hawaii, a bit of Lou Reed and the Velvet Underground’s “Ocean,” in the minute plus opening.  I thought it would be an instrumental but the voice of Steve Dennis sings at 1:08 in over the simple strum and slow-motion splashing of the cymbal, a nice vibration that closes out in a most hypnotic way.  Along with being very musical the five songs elegantly capture feeling and heart in a beautiful and compelling way. 

Previously on TMR Zoo 

Steve Dennis Links: 
Spotify 

Apple iTunes 

YouTube 

Monday, January 28, 2019

John Lennon Imagine


Gimme Some Truth

The Making of John Lennon's  IMAGINE album

 A study by Joe Viglione



When one's memories are only of the audio of this set of recordings of the Imagine album by John Lennon, you have to prepare yourself for a new thought process of a dear and important work, a thought process that actually gives for a renewed appreciation for one of the great solo Beatle epics.


The imagery that folds over and embraces the songs that we know so well - John and Yoko all dressed up and in a canoe while "Crippled Inside" is playing - imprints new impressions over the reminders of John's voice and the eclectic playing of the musicians, all coming back like a resurrection.  Hearing the instrumentation with a new clarity is the obverse of what you once knew, and it's a delight.

Seeing Phil Spector - and knowing the outcome of the iconic producer's life - is a bit of a reality check, but one has to trade off his dark side for Spector's brilliance.  And that is exemplified by my favorite track on Imagine, "Jealous Guy."

Lennon appreciates Spector and tells him so sincely. 

 While singing "Gimme Some Truth" the nuances of the rock star's vocal patterns, the body language while recording this now familiar music, it's as fascinating as it is important.  

"That's the nasty one" John says to George Harrison playing him "How Do You Sleep."  It's audio revenge porn and Lennon is delighted to play a song about his old pal.  Hearing and watching Lennon go through the creative moments on such an epic piece is masterful of the filmmakers (Produced and directed by Andrew Solt from the original 1971 Imagine movie directed by John and Yoko.)

The digital soundtrack mixed at Abbey Road Studios, London by Peter Cobbin and Allan Rouse.  "Making of Imagine" May 1971 (oh to go back in time!) Ascot, England. Producers - John, Yoko and Phil Spector. 

John Lennon - piano, guitar and vocals

 George Harrison - guitar

Nicky Hopkins - piano

Jim Keltner - drums

Klaus Voormann - bass guitar

Allan White - drums

"Don't confuse the songs with your own life," Lennon says outside the studio. "I mean, they might have relevance to your own life but, a lot of things do."

Seeing John Lennon look so young, hearing the blues in his voice for this pop song/ballad,  and watching so much footage of  this particular rock star in casual moments outside the studio, serious moment at the microphone, just so important for posterity, so important for context, so beautiful to experience.

As the one hour, seven minute and fifty-four second   film concludes, John's angelic voice is singing "Oh My Love" a capella. It is tremendous.  Then it snaps back to the DVD home page to Imagine.

 

 

JOHN LENNON’S IMAGINE – THE ULTIMATE COLLECTION

The Legendary Singer/Songwriter’s Most Celebrated Solo Album Honored With A Number Of Special Audio Releases 
Six-Disc Imagine – The Ultimate Collection Includes Brand New Remastered Stereo Mix, Raw Studio Recordings, Outtakes, Extras and Audio Documentary That Explores Evolution Of Each Song Plus New Surround Mixes On Blu-ray And Updated Quadrasonic Mix
For The Ultimate Deep Listening Experience
Imagine and Gimme Some Truth Films Restored and Remastered With Exclusive, Never-Before-Seen Extras 

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Craig Fenton Reviews Audioscam 4 KICKING AND SCREAMING

The group: Audioscam
The cd:  Kicking and Screaming
Review by Craig Fenton

https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/audioscam4





Audioscam- Kicking And Screaming 2018:

On a conference call circa August 2011 to promote Audioscam’s second release “When The Money’s Gone” I was introduced to Brian Pitcher.

The initial question I had was did he make a concerted effort to author songs that would somehow accomplish the nearly unworkable?  That is the fulfillment of pleasing three vastly different record buyers, the passionate British Invasion and straight-ahead rocker (especially 1964-Mid 1970’s), the rebellious New Wave, Power Pop, and Punk fan of the 70’s and early 80’s, and the exponent of the Indie-Rock scene from 2000 to the present.

Brian’s response cemented how potent he was as a songwriter and Audioscam as a band.  Brian told me “As long as I have been writing songs I have never attempted a pre-fabricated approach.  I let things take a natural course.”
With the fans of the aforementioned styles of sound as divided as the current United States political parties, it gave me an even more reinforced view of Audioscam.

After over four years we finally have the follow-up to 2014’s “Audioscam 3.”  This time around the Australian powerhouse serves up the five tracks “Kicking And Screaming.”  It is one thing to commandeer a room but another to sequester the listener.  From the first note we are secluded.  There is no outside interference, the only duty is to interpret the stellar recorded works and all else becomes secondary.     

The opening number “Just Like Jamaica” serves a dual-meaning.  Brian penned the tune first as homage to the 1988 Jamaican Bobsled team that gained world-wide attention and everlasting respect at the 1988 Olympic Winter Games in Calgary, Canada.

Brian’s additional (but in no way taking a back-seat) message is to never let others foil your dreams and prevent your life from taking its own unique shape.  Comingling the mellow sounds of Jimmy Buffet with a dose of Rock “N’ Roll” the latest project is not only off and running but catapulting forward.

Track 2 “Baby Done Bad” is Brian’s story of meeting his wife Julie.  We the listener are thrown into the reverse time machine and land in the year 1972.  On the radio is the rock and boogie sound of Humble Pie’s “30 Days In The Hole.”  Audioscam has unearthed the Humble Pie sound and brought it forward.

Next up is “Get Used To This.”  After getting married Brian found himself in a place he couldn’t believe existed.  There was contentment and stability.  Although in the back of his mind there was skepticism that the dream would be shattered, Brian and Julie remain an unbreakable team.  The Talking Heads, Television, and Joe Jackson resonate in your mind as Audioscam sends a message of hope.

The fourth song “Batesfield” brings Brian back to yesteryear.  Written by his friend from High School, Mark Gable.  A bank robbery and a country mile removed from the crime is the thematic scene.  ACDC and Alice Cooper are prevalent in the musical beat.

Onward to “Hand Of Sin.”  Open to your own interpretation.  To quote Brian “There is an evil vibe to it.”  Talking Heads and Graham Parker come to mind in terms of the musical spectrum.


Here are the players:   
Brian Pitcher- Vocals, drums, acoustic guitar
Brad Wallace- Bass, backing vocals, guitar, and keyboards
Wayne Macintosh- Guitar

Additional Personnel:

Tenor Mel Miller- Steel drums and pans on Just Like Jamaica
Jason Byrne- Guitar on Batesfield and When The Money’s All Gone
Ross Wedding- Guitar on When The Money’s All Gone
Miss Ari Safari- Backing vocals on When The Money’s All Gone
Audioscam’s gift to us for an eternal summer.

After being engulfed in the new release you can purchase the following as well:

Abbattack August 12, 2008

When The Money’s Gone August 18, 2011

Audioscam 3 May 6, 2014


All the best,
Craig Fenton
Author: Jefferson Airplane “Take Me To A Circus Tent”
Jefferson Starship “Have You Seen The Stars Tonite”